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Call for nomination of experts for Decadal Climate Variability workshop

26
Apr
2015

The Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC) and Ocean Studies Board (OSB) are pleased to announce a new National Research Council (NRC) workshop to review the current science for decadal climate variability. Statement of Task is below.

We are seeking nominations for membership of the committee that will be appointed to plan the workshop. The committee of approximately 6 members will organize the workshop through a number of conference calls, lead the workshop and serve as session facilitators. A workshop summary report will be prepared by a designated rapporteur based on workshop presentations and transcripts.

Members of the planning committee should have expertise on topics including, but not limited to: atmospheric and oceanic observations, climate and ocean modeling, climate variability, climate attribution, and science communication.

To submit a nomination, please fill out this form<http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2111266/Call-for-Nominations-Frontiers-in-Decadal-Climate-Variability-A-Workshop>.

Having the appropriate membership is the key to the success of every NRC activity, so we appreciate your help in the committee nomination process.  Thank you for your assistance.

Statement of Task

An ad hoc NRC committee will plan and conduct a public workshop to bring together atmospheric and ocean climate experts to review the current science for decadal climate variability. Workshop participants will be asked to:

  1. examine our understanding of the processes governing decadal-scale variability in key climate parameters, observational evidence of decadal variability and potential forcings, and model-based experiments to explore possible factors affecting decadal variations;
  2. identify key science, observing, and modeling gaps;
  3. consider the utility and accuracy of various observations for tracking long-term climate variability, anticipating the onset and end of hiatus regimes, and closing the long-term heat budget;
  4. consider the utility of hiatus regimes as a metric for evaluating performance of long-term climate models; and
  5. consider how best to communicate current understanding of climate variability, including potential causes and consequences, to non-expert audiences.